IEC STANDARD ON ELECTROMAGNETIC COMPATIBILITY (EMC)

Monday, March 28, 2011

IEC 61000: Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC) is the counterpart of the IEEE Power Quality StandardsPlease take note that the IEC does not yet use the term power quality in any of its standard documents. Instead the IEC uses the term electromagnetic compatibility, which is not the same as power quality but there is a strong overlap between the two terms. IEC 61000: Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC) Standard consists of six parts, each consisting of several sections. Listed below are brief descriptions of IEC Standard sections that are related to power quality.

IEC 61000-1: General

1-1. Application and interpretation of fundamental definitions and terms.
1-2. Methodology for the achievement of functional safety of electrical and electronic equipment.
1-3. The effects of high-altitude Electromagnetic Pulse (HEMP) on civil equipment and systems.
1-4. Historical rationale for the limitation of power-frequency conducted harmonic current emissions from equipment, in the frequency range up to 2 kHz.
1-5. High power electromagnetic (HPEM) effects on civil systems.

IEC 61000-2: Environment


2-1. Description of the environment – Electromagnetic environment for low-frequency conducted disturbances and signaling in power supply systems.
2-2. Compatibility levels for low-frequency conducted disturbances and signaling in public supply systems.
2-3. Description of the environment – Radiated and non-network frequency-related conducted disturbances.
2-3. Description of the environment – Radiated and non-network frequency-related conducted disturbances.
2-4. Compatibility levels in industrial plants for low-frequency conducted disturbances.
2-5. Classification of electromagnetic environments.
2-6. Assessment of the emission levels in the power supply of industrial plants as regards low-frequency conducted disturbances.
2-7. Low-frequency magnetic fields in various environments.
2-8. Voltage dips and short interruptions on public electric power supply systems with statistical measurement results.
2-9. Description of High-altitude Electromagnetic Pulse (HEMP) environment - Radiated disturbance.
2-10. Description of High-altitude Electromagnetic Pulse (HEMP) environment - Conducted disturbance.
2-11. Classification of HEMP environments.
2-12. Compatibility levels for low-frequency conducted disturbances and signaling in public medium-voltage power supply systems.
2-13. High-power electromagnetic (HPEM) environments - Radiated and conducted.
2-14. Overvoltages on public electricity distribution networks.


IEC 61000-3: Limits


3-1. Overview of emission standards and guides.
3-2. Limits for Harmonic Current Emissions (equipment input current up to and including 16 A per phase).
3-3. Limitation of voltage changes, voltage fluctuations and flicker in public low-voltage supply systems, for equipment with rated current ≤16 A per phase and not subject to conditional connection.
3-4. Limitation of emission of harmonic currents in low-voltage power supply systems for equipment with rated current greater than 16 A.
3-5. Limitation of voltage fluctuations and flicker in low-voltage power supply systems for equipment with rated current greater than 16 A.
3-6. Assessment of emission limits for the connection of distorting installations to MV, HV and EHV power systems.
3-7. Assessment of emission limits for the connection of fluctuating installations to MV, HV and EHV power systems.
3-8. Signaling on low-voltage electrical installations - Emission levels, frequency bands and electromagnetic disturbance levels.
3-9. Limits for interharmonic current emissions (equipment with input power 16 A per phase and prone to produce interharmonics by design).
3-10. Emission limits in the frequency range 2 ... 9 kHz.
3-11. Limitation of voltage changes, voltage fluctuations and flicker in public low-voltage supply systems - Equipment with rated current ≤ 75 A and subject to conditional connection.
3-12. Limits for harmonic currents produced by equipment connected to public low-voltage systems with input current > 16 A and ≤ 75 A per phase.
3-13. Assessment of emission limits for the connection of unbalanced installations to MV, HV and EHV power systems.
3-14. Assessment of emission limits for the connection of disturbing installations to LV power systems.
3-15. Electromagnetic immunity and emission requirements for dispersed generation in LV networks.


IEC 61000-4: Testing and Measurement Techniques


4-1. Overview of Immunity tests.
4-2. Electrostatic discharge immunity test.
4-3. Radiated, radio frequency, electromagnetic field immunity test.
4-4. Electrical fast transient/burst immunity test.
4-5. Surge immunity test.
4-6. Immunity to conducted disturbances, induced by radio-frequency fields.
4-7. General guide on harmonics and interharmonics measurements and instrumentation, for power supply systems and equipment connected thereto.
4-8. Power frequency magnetic field immunity test.
4-9. Pulse Magnetic Field Immunity Test.
4-10. Damped oscillatory magnetic field immunity test.
4-11. Voltage dips, short interruptions and voltage variations immunity tests.
4-12. Ring wave immunity test.
4-13. Harmonics and interharmonics including mains signaling at AC power port, low frequency immunity tests.
4-14. Voltage fluctuation immunity test for equipment with input current not exceeding 16 A per phase.
4-15. Flickermeter - Functional and design specifications.
4-16. Test for immunity to conducted, common mode disturbances in the frequency range 0 Hz to 150 kHz.
4-17. Ripple on DC input power port immunity test.
4-18. Damped oscillatory wave immunity test.
4-19. Guide for selection of high frequency emission and immunity test sites.
4-20. Emission and immunity testing in transverse electromagnetic (TEM) waveguides.
4-21. Reverberation chamber test methods.
4-22. Radiated emissions and immunity measurements in fully anechoic rooms (FARs).
4-23. Test methods for protective devices for HEMP and other radiated disturbances.
4-24. Test methods for protective devices for HEMP conducted disturbance.
4-25. HEMP immunity test methods for equipment and systems.
4-26. Calibration of probes and associated instruments for measuring electromagnetic fields.
4-27. Unbalance, immunity test.
4-28. Variation of power frequency, immunity tests.
4-29. Voltage dips, short interruptions and voltage variations on DC input power port immunity tests.
4-30. Power quality measurement methods.
4-31. Measurements in the frequency range 2 kHz to 9 kHz.
4-32. High-altitude electromagnetic pulse (HEMP) simulator compendium.
4-33. Measurement methods for high-power transient parameters.
4-34. Voltage dips, short interruptions and voltage variations immunity tests for equipment with input current more than 16 A per phase.
4-35. HPEM simulator compendium.


IEC 61000-5: Installation and Mitigation Guidelines


5-1. General considerations.
5-2. Earthing and cabling.
5-3. HEMP protection concepts.
5-4. Immunity to HEMP - Specification for protective devices against HEMP radiated disturbance.
5-5. Specification of protective devices for HEMP conducted disturbance.
5-6. Mitigation of external EM influences.
5-7. Degrees of protection provided by enclosures against electromagnetic disturbances (EM code).
5-8. HEMP protection methods for the distributed infrastructure.
5-9. System-level susceptibility assessments for HEMP and HPEM.


IEC 61000-6: Generic Standards


6-1. Immunity for residential, commercial and light-industrial environments.
6-2. Immunity for industrial environments.
6-3. Emission standard for residential, commercial and light-industrial environments.
6-4. Emission standard for industrial environments.
6-5. Immunity for power station and substation environments.
6-6. HEMP immunity for indoor equipment.
6-7. Immunity requirements for safety-related systems and for equipment intended to perform functions in a safety related system (functional safety) in industrial environments.


Reference:
Bollen, M. (2000). Understanding Power Quality Problems: Voltage Sags and Interruptions.

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I am an Electrical Engineer with a Masters Degree in Business Administration. My interest is in Power Quality, Diagnostic Testing and Protective Relaying. I have been working in an electric distribution utility for more than a decade. I handle PQ studies, power system analysis, diagnostic testing, protective relaying and capital budgeting for company projects.